Saturday November 2, 2019
Saturday, November 2, 2019
Saturday November 2, 2019

Ahramonline – English

Egypt's military production authority, US Hyundai Technology Co. ink MoU on technology transfer

Ahramonline – Egypt

Squash: Egypt's Nour El Sherbini retains World Championship title

ANGOP – Angola

Angolan ambassador to Portugal highlights investment conditions in Angola

maroc.ma - Morocco

Colombian Official: Morocco, 'Strategic Partner' of Colombia in Africa

Morocco World News – Morocco

Morocco and Italy Declare Strategic Partnership, Coordination

Ethiopian News Agency – Ethiopia

Russia Eyes Increasing Trade, Economic Cooperation with Ethiopia: Ambassador

The New Times – Rwanda

No price is high for healing Genocide survivors

It is difficult to comprehend that an educated man, one with all his full faculties, after years marinating in the hate ideology, leads a campaign to exterminate a people in his village only to turn around two decades later to declare he had suddenly turned into an altar boy.

For someone like that, who has been convicted for having the blood of hundreds or even thousands on his hands, to declare that they had seen the light and would like to share their experience with others tempts someone to take it with a pinch of salt.

But Rwanda Correctional Services thinks differently. They believe that the convicts are genuine and have even helped identify the whereabouts of over 120 mass graves of victims of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi

But this Born-Again phenomenon does not impress the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG); it does not buy it completely. Jean-Damascène Bizimana is of the view that the only people who can help heal and send a positive message are Genocide survivors who have defied all odds, survived and forgiven their executioners.

Bizimana is of the view that the Open-air preachers who have made it a habit, on visiting day – to start preaching on the evils of Genocide, might instead trigger bouts of trauma among survivors.

But the real question is; “how sincere are they?” 20 years behind bars is an eternity and inmates can even make a pact with the devil to get out of the walled-in existence.

It is almost impossible to gauge the sincerity of a person, but anything that can erase the traumatic experiences of Genocide survivors is worth a try.

Ahramonline – Egypt

Manufactured public opinion: The new cyber war

By: Ahmed Al-Moslemany

A hashtag then a trend then nothing…Thus goes the manufacturing of illusion. When the hashtag begins its journey towards a vacuum, many feel that the world is waiting for that launch. After a while, everybody forgets all about the previous trend amidst the new hustle of trends and the chaos of new “hashtaggers.”

The hashtag rises and its opposite also rises, the hashtag and its anti-hashtag rise together. The hashtaggers are restless, for the main characteristic of this new thing is its mercuriality. No constancy, everything will perish after a while and the criteria that have governed the past hours may not be the ones that govern the next few hours. Endless fluid opinions and opinion leaders aren’t ashamed of shifting their viewpoints around the clock, swaying from one side to the other.

The virtual world is about to triumph over the real world. We are facing a mixed world where globalised man lives half in reality and half in imagination; half of his life based on planet Earth involving how to earn a living and meet his needs, and the other half clinging to the mobile screen, revolving with artificial satellites in their distant orbits.

Governments and institutions as well as communities and individuals realise the big change that occurred to Man’s nature, his reality having shrunk to a half, or less than half. As a result, the race has begun to invest in the virtual half in the new man.

One of the biggest features of the contemporary world order has become cybernetic war. Within the battles of this global electronic war, new mechanisms have emerged: the electronic battalions. These battalions are made up of anonymous persons sitting before secret monitors to execute their masters’ vision -- to elevate those they deem worthy of elevation and tarnish those they think worthy of tarnishing.

Electronic battalions were exclusive to a limited number of governments and intelligence services, but they have since expanded to be one of the mechanisms of groups and organisations as well as companies and persons.

It is now in the capacity of a person to establish an electronic battalion that defends him and smear his opponents. Groups and movements have become capable of devoting their battalions to lie about other parties, describing them with all that denigrates them and undermines their stature and path. Electronic battalions sit in pitch-dark rooms without being seen and write whatever they like, for their names and accounts are all fake.

The New York Times published a cartoon once of two dogs sitting in front of a computer screen, while one of them is hesitant about writing, the other dog says to him “don’t worry, the internet doesn’t know that you’re a dog.”

Electronic dogs have destroyed homelands and peoples. They have torn down social fabric and national belongingness amid the follies of millions of recipients, writing haughtily and arrogantly as if they are big philosophers or prestigious thinkers, while they are just a cheap tool in the hands of cybernetic dogs manipulating their minds with the tip of their tails.

Global cybernetic war has transcended that old level of electronic battalions, and computer programs have been designed to work automatically to achieve the same objective. A wedge is driven between the people and the authorities, between the people themselves or between a state and another, and every party escalates its attack on the other party, while the person administering the escalation in reality is the one standing behind the flood of comments which the program has launched in specific directions.

In my speech to the forum of the Strategic Vision Group – “Russia-Islamic World” (RIW Group) presided over by Rustam Minnikhanov, President of Tatarstan, which was held in St. Petersburg in September and was attended Farid Mukhametshin, Deputy Chairman of International Affairs in the Federal Russian Council, and Ambassador Veniamin Popov, I called the fake popular approaches produced by cybernetic wars “manufactured public opinion”. This isn’t natural public opinion, whatever the foundation it is built upon or what it is moving towards. It is, rather, public opinion that is manufactured in other capitals and other bodies aiming at delivering an untrue public opinion on a certain issue. It is stealing the right of speech on behalf of the people by an unknown manufacturing source.

Manufactured public opinion represents a great threat to freedom and democracy because it obscures the real public opinion. It invests in the “silent majority,” staying away from the scene. Thus, manufactured public opinion becomes more powerful and more present, given the absence of the majority and the ascendancy of the cybernetic minority.

Contemporary democracy is threatened by a dangerous triangle, similar to the Bermuda Triangle, that is capable of swallowing everything. It is threatened by the ascendancy of money, manufactured public opinion and the silent majority.

It has become absolutely impossible for a candidate to be engaged in an election in the West, or not in the West, without the financial support that in turn provides media support. It has also become impossible to attract the silent majority to a scene it realised has become captive to money and media. Moreover, it has become impossible to realise the real public opinion approaches in the light of the ascendance of manufactured public opinion.

Pressure from sensible people against the chaos of opinion and the floods of accounts advocating crime or terrorism, or opposing security and peace, have now made big corporations respond positively. In April 2018, Twitter announced the deletion of 1.2 million accounts during the years 2015–2017. During the first quarter of 2018, Facebook deleted more than half a billion accounts, and in the last quarter of the same year it deleted more than a billion accounts.

According to the Associated Press, Facebook deleted 2.2 billion fake accounts during the first quarter of 2019. Hence, more than 2 billion accounts were deleted from Facebook in three months only!

These deletion numbers clarify the volume of tragedy threatening human thought. Undoubtedly, trillions of foolish, criminal and terrorist opinions are still steadfast and active.

Manufactured public opinion is a great threat and confronting it is next to impossible. It is the biggest danger facing the national state in the 21st century. Of course, there exist those sensible persons using social media networks. They are sensible supporters and opponents possessing vision and perception and can offer brilliant ideas. They have fascinating viewpoints, profound knowledge and inventive visions. However, those sensible persons can’t appear amid all this clamour. They are similar to a child who is shouting in a raucous square or like a person delivering an excellent speech in the Sahara.

******

The New Times – Rwanda

Data from e-Golf more than Rwandan, it’s African

By: Gitura Mwaura

The just-launched e-Golf arguably is going to be the first ready-to-drive electric vehicle to be fully tested on driving conditions in Africa.

South Africa, the foremost country on the continent with over 1000 EVs already on its roads, receives quite some mention. But there is little if any EV data specific to conditions in Africa.

One only need look at some of the major EV research, specifically the International Energy Agency’s annual Global EV Outlook and the Electric Vehicle Outlook by Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Both the annual analyses don’t yield any data or research on EV potential in Africa.

This, therefore, makes the debut of the e-Golf significant not just for Rwanda but the continent. The Chief Executive of Volkswagen Group South Africa acknowledged this, noting how “Volkswagen wants to make the e-Golf pilot project in Rwanda a blueprint for electric mobility in Africa.”

The project will collect data on the EV’s performance and consumers’ reception and use trends, including altitude, terrain and, among other factors, gradient. This last will be useful to test given Rwanda’s often steep hilly drives.

Other than the “thousand hills”, Rwanda often exemplifies Africa. And the fact is the challenges that affect that EV industry globally are more pronounced in much of the continent.

Global issues include the need for significant infrastructure investments such as dedicated charging stations, electricity, as well as change in consumer attitudes and behaviour.

In Africa, charging stations are few, with South Africa having the most at about 200 stations. In the region Tanzania and particularly country Kenya has a number of them, driven by increasing uptake of EVs. Rwanda aims to have at least 15 charging stations across Kigali in the coming weeks.

Power availability does not appear to be a problem at the moment. Aspiring countries, including those already with the EVs have an eye to the increase in the number of EVs. The Rwanda Energy Group has similarly given thumbs up with the promise of being up to the task as the power demand increases.

For now, projected demand for electric vehicles in Africa appears not have as yet been determined. Globally, however, according to the Electric Vehicle Outlook 2019, passenger vehicle sales will comprise 57 per cent of all vehicles by 2040. Overall, 30 per cent of the global passenger vehicle fleet are expected to be electric by that year.

In terms of numbers, over 2 million electric vehicles were sold in 2018, up from just a few thousand in 2010, and there is no sign of slowing down.

It is expected that annual passenger EV sales to rise to 10 million in 2025, 28 million in 2030 and 56 million by 2040.

It should be hoped that the homegrown African electric vehicles currently under development will feature in these sales. There are three that we can talk about beginning with the Joule, the failed South African locally-developed electric car.

The Joule was supposed to be a zero-emissions, five-seater, multi-purpose vehicle. But it never made it, despite making its debut at the Paris Motor Show. Despite holding great promise, it folded in 2012 after Optimal Energy, the Joule developer, failed to find a commercial partner.

The Lion Ozuma 551, launched in July 2019 by students in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Nigeria, does not look exactly pretty. Perhaps it’s because of the extremely low cost ($2,200) it took to build it. But it is credible and holds as much promise as any global electric vehicle.

Then there is Uganda’s Kiira, which many in East Africa including myself are a fan of. The flagship Kiira EVS has had its stutters. It, however, emerged fine during its longest test drive of 1,600km from Kampala to Kisoro and back. It holds great promise, not to mention other of the concept vehicles by Kiira Motors Corporation that includes the Kayoola solar-powered bus.

All told, we are not very far hitting the road with our homegrown electric vehicle that will already have incorporated African condition. Therefore, data from the e-Golf will help for those that, like itself, are made outside the continent. The e-Golf will be imported from Germany.

Other EVs manufactured outside Africa that we often see plying our roads, particularly in South Africa, include the Nissan Leaf, the BMW i3, and the Jaguar I-PACE.

Their ride is also all about the environment. Thus, the optimism the internal combustion engines will reduce as the EVs rise.

Ahramonline – Egypt

Manufactured public opinion: The new cyber war

By: Ahmed Al-Moslemany

A hashtag then a trend then nothing…Thus goes the manufacturing of illusion. When the hashtag begins its journey towards a vacuum, many feel that the world is waiting for that launch. After a while, everybody forgets all about the previous trend amidst the new hustle of trends and the chaos of new “hashtaggers.”

The hashtag rises and its opposite also rises, the hashtag and its anti-hashtag rise together. The hashtaggers are restless, for the main characteristic of this new thing is its mercuriality. No constancy, everything will perish after a while and the criteria that have governed the past hours may not be the ones that govern the next few hours. Endless fluid opinions and opinion leaders aren’t ashamed of shifting their viewpoints around the clock, swaying from one side to the other.

The virtual world is about to triumph over the real world. We are facing a mixed world where globalised man lives half in reality and half in imagination; half of his life based on planet Earth involving how to earn a living and meet his needs, and the other half clinging to the mobile screen, revolving with artificial satellites in their distant orbits.

Governments and institutions as well as communities and individuals realise the big change that occurred to Man’s nature, his reality having shrunk to a half, or less than half. As a result, the race has begun to invest in the virtual half in the new man.

One of the biggest features of the contemporary world order has become cybernetic war. Within the battles of this global electronic war, new mechanisms have emerged: the electronic battalions. These battalions are made up of anonymous persons sitting before secret monitors to execute their masters’ vision -- to elevate those they deem worthy of elevation and tarnish those they think worthy of tarnishing.

Electronic battalions were exclusive to a limited number of governments and intelligence services, but they have since expanded to be one of the mechanisms of groups and organisations as well as companies and persons.

It is now in the capacity of a person to establish an electronic battalion that defends him and smear his opponents. Groups and movements have become capable of devoting their battalions to lie about other parties, describing them with all that denigrates them and undermines their stature and path. Electronic battalions sit in pitch-dark rooms without being seen and write whatever they like, for their names and accounts are all fake.

The New York Times published a cartoon once of two dogs sitting in front of a computer screen, while one of them is hesitant about writing, the other dog says to him “don’t worry, the internet doesn’t know that you’re a dog.”

Electronic dogs have destroyed homelands and peoples. They have torn down social fabric and national belongingness amid the follies of millions of recipients, writing haughtily and arrogantly as if they are big philosophers or prestigious thinkers, while they are just a cheap tool in the hands of cybernetic dogs manipulating their minds with the tip of their tails.

Global cybernetic war has transcended that old level of electronic battalions, and computer programs have been designed to work automatically to achieve the same objective. A wedge is driven between the people and the authorities, between the people themselves or between a state and another, and every party escalates its attack on the other party, while the person administering the escalation in reality is the one standing behind the flood of comments which the program has launched in specific directions.

In my speech to the forum of the Strategic Vision Group – “Russia-Islamic World” (RIW Group) presided over by Rustam Minnikhanov, President of Tatarstan, which was held in St. Petersburg in September and was attended Farid Mukhametshin, Deputy Chairman of International Affairs in the Federal Russian Council, and Ambassador Veniamin Popov, I called the fake popular approaches produced by cybernetic wars “manufactured public opinion”. This isn’t natural public opinion, whatever the foundation it is built upon or what it is moving towards. It is, rather, public opinion that is manufactured in other capitals and other bodies aiming at delivering an untrue public opinion on a certain issue. It is stealing the right of speech on behalf of the people by an unknown manufacturing source.

Manufactured public opinion represents a great threat to freedom and democracy because it obscures the real public opinion. It invests in the “silent majority,” staying away from the scene. Thus, manufactured public opinion becomes more powerful and more present, given the absence of the majority and the ascendancy of the cybernetic minority.

Contemporary democracy is threatened by a dangerous triangle, similar to the Bermuda Triangle, that is capable of swallowing everything. It is threatened by the ascendancy of money, manufactured public opinion and the silent majority.

It has become absolutely impossible for a candidate to be engaged in an election in the West, or not in the West, without the financial support that in turn provides media support. It has also become impossible to attract the silent majority to a scene it realised has become captive to money and media. Moreover, it has become impossible to realise the real public opinion approaches in the light of the ascendance of manufactured public opinion.

Pressure from sensible people against the chaos of opinion and the floods of accounts advocating crime or terrorism, or opposing security and peace, have now made big corporations respond positively. In April 2018, Twitter announced the deletion of 1.2 million accounts during the years 2015–2017. During the first quarter of 2018, Facebook deleted more than half a billion accounts, and in the last quarter of the same year it deleted more than a billion accounts.

According to the Associated Press, Facebook deleted 2.2 billion fake accounts during the first quarter of 2019. Hence, more than 2 billion accounts were deleted from Facebook in three months only!

These deletion numbers clarify the volume of tragedy threatening human thought. Undoubtedly, trillions of foolish, criminal and terrorist opinions are still steadfast and active.

Manufactured public opinion is a great threat and confronting it is next to impossible. It is the biggest danger facing the national state in the 21st century. Of course, there exist those sensible persons using social media networks. They are sensible supporters and opponents possessing vision and perception and can offer brilliant ideas. They have fascinating viewpoints, profound knowledge and inventive visions. However, those sensible persons can’t appear amid all this clamour. They are similar to a child who is shouting in a raucous square or like a person delivering an excellent speech in the Sahara.

******

The New Times – Rwanda

Data from e-Golf more than Rwandan, it’s African

By: Gitura Mwaura

The just-launched e-Golf arguably is going to be the first ready-to-drive electric vehicle to be fully tested on driving conditions in Africa.

South Africa, the foremost country on the continent with over 1000 EVs already on its roads, receives quite some mention. But there is little if any EV data specific to conditions in Africa.

One only need look at some of the major EV research, specifically the International Energy Agency’s annual Global EV Outlook and the Electric Vehicle Outlook by Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Both the annual analyses don’t yield any data or research on EV potential in Africa.

This, therefore, makes the debut of the e-Golf significant not just for Rwanda but the continent. The Chief Executive of Volkswagen Group South Africa acknowledged this, noting how “Volkswagen wants to make the e-Golf pilot project in Rwanda a blueprint for electric mobility in Africa.”

The project will collect data on the EV’s performance and consumers’ reception and use trends, including altitude, terrain and, among other factors, gradient. This last will be useful to test given Rwanda’s often steep hilly drives.

Other than the “thousand hills”, Rwanda often exemplifies Africa. And the fact is the challenges that affect that EV industry globally are more pronounced in much of the continent.

Global issues include the need for significant infrastructure investments such as dedicated charging stations, electricity, as well as change in consumer attitudes and behaviour.

In Africa, charging stations are few, with South Africa having the most at about 200 stations. In the region Tanzania and particularly country Kenya has a number of them, driven by increasing uptake of EVs. Rwanda aims to have at least 15 charging stations across Kigali in the coming weeks.

Power availability does not appear to be a problem at the moment. Aspiring countries, including those already with the EVs have an eye to the increase in the number of EVs. The Rwanda Energy Group has similarly given thumbs up with the promise of being up to the task as the power demand increases.

For now, projected demand for electric vehicles in Africa appears not have as yet been determined. Globally, however, according to the Electric Vehicle Outlook 2019, passenger vehicle sales will comprise 57 per cent of all vehicles by 2040. Overall, 30 per cent of the global passenger vehicle fleet are expected to be electric by that year.

In terms of numbers, over 2 million electric vehicles were sold in 2018, up from just a few thousand in 2010, and there is no sign of slowing down.

It is expected that annual passenger EV sales to rise to 10 million in 2025, 28 million in 2030 and 56 million by 2040.

It should be hoped that the homegrown African electric vehicles currently under development will feature in these sales. There are three that we can talk about beginning with the Joule, the failed South African locally-developed electric car.

The Joule was supposed to be a zero-emissions, five-seater, multi-purpose vehicle. But it never made it, despite making its debut at the Paris Motor Show. Despite holding great promise, it folded in 2012 after Optimal Energy, the Joule developer, failed to find a commercial partner.

The Lion Ozuma 551, launched in July 2019 by students in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Nigeria, does not look exactly pretty. Perhaps it’s because of the extremely low cost ($2,200) it took to build it. But it is credible and holds as much promise as any global electric vehicle.

Then there is Uganda’s Kiira, which many in East Africa including myself are a fan of. The flagship Kiira EVS has had its stutters. It, however, emerged fine during its longest test drive of 1,600km from Kampala to Kisoro and back. It holds great promise, not to mention other of the concept vehicles by Kiira Motors Corporation that includes the Kayoola solar-powered bus.

All told, we are not very far hitting the road with our homegrown electric vehicle that will already have incorporated African condition. Therefore, data from the e-Golf will help for those that, like itself, are made outside the continent. The e-Golf will be imported from Germany.

Other EVs manufactured outside Africa that we often see plying our roads, particularly in South Africa, include the Nissan Leaf, the BMW i3, and the Jaguar I-PACE.

Their ride is also all about the environment. Thus, the optimism the internal combustion engines will reduce as the EVs rise.